Wednesday, March 16, 2011

open science

Recently in North Carolina, moximer & David Dobbs and others discussed the value of opening up science research (such that all research is freely available for searching and interpretation, even draft versions and failed experiments, at least under the strong proposal). It's an interesting discussion (audio is a bit crappy, but whaddayagonnado?):


What's Keeping Us from Open Science? Is It the Powers That Be, Or Is It... Us? from Smartley-Dunn on Vimeo.

Hence, I thought it might be nice to list some open source journals offering free access to scientific research:
  • PLoS is a nonprofit organization of scientists and physicians committed to making the world's scientific and medical literature a freely available public resource.
  • The Internet Archive, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, is building a digital library of Internet sites and other cultural artifacts in digital form. Like a paper library, we provide free access to researchers, historians, scholars, and the general public.
  • CiteSeer: The NEC Scientific Literature Digital Library incorporating autonomous citation indexing, awareness and tracking, citation context, related document retrieval.
  • arXiv.org e-Print archive: Open access to 664,014 e-prints in Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, Quantitative Biology, Quantitative Finance and Statistics.
  • Directory of open access journals: This service covers free, full text, quality controlled scientific and scholarly journals. We aim to cover all subjects and languages. There are now 6271 journals in the directory. Currently 2722 journals are searchable at article level.
  • Free Full Text: a search engine returning full text scientific articles with no access fees.

2 comments:

Bryce said...

RT @karenblakeman: New useful search engine that returns full text scientific articles not subject to access fees http://www.knowmade.com/free-fulltext-pdf.html

Chris said...

Bryce, this is excellent, thanks!

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